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Still from Fancy Reba McEntire Video
Video still from Reba McEntire’s “Fancy.”

Required Viewing: “Fancy” by Reba McEntire-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zplc4Ienkws

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Dorothea Lange’s “Migrant Mother” Photographs in the Farm Security Administration Collection: An Overview

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1. “Migrant Mother”

1.) Reproduction number: LC-USF34-9058-C (film negative)
Caption: “Destitute peapickers in California; a 32 year old mother of seven children. February 1936.” (retouched version)

Thumb in lower right has been removed from the printed imagemigrant mother retouched

2. “Migrant Mother”

1a.) Reproduction number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-12883 (digital file from print); LC-USZ62-95653 (film copy negative)
Caption: “Destitute peapickers in California …”

Note: This is an unretouched version of “Migrant Mother.” This version of the image shows a thumb in the immediate foreground on the right side.

Migrant Mother unretouched

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Here’s a children’s book about “Migrant Mother.”

migrant mother childs book

Migrant Mother: How a Photograph Defined the Great Depression

by Don Nardo

(THAT’S RIGHT!  “HOW A PHOTOGRAPH DEFINED THE GREAT DEPRESSION”)

Description from Amazon page:
“In the 1930s, photographer Dorothea Lange traveled the American West documenting the experiences of those devastated by the Great Depression. She wanted to use the power of the image to effect political change, but even she could hardly have expected the effect that a simple portrait of a worn-looking woman and her children would have on history. This image, taken at a migrant workers camp in Nipomo, California, would eventually come to be seen as the very symbol of the Depression. The photograph helped reveal the true cost of the disaster on human lives and shocked the U.S. government into providing relief for the millions of other families devastated by the Depression.”
  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up

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Daughter of ‘Migrant Mother’ proud of story by Carolyn Jones

 

 

 

Passing Likeness: Dorothea Lange’s “Migrant Mother” and the Paradox of lconicity

by Sally Stein